People

Tania Kim (Principal Investigator)

Profile pic

Department of Entomology
125 W. Waters Hall
1603 Old Claflin Place
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS 66506-4004

Email: tkim@ksu.edu

Twitter@tania_n_kim

Curriculum vitae

Education and Affiliation
  • Visiting Assistant Professor in Biology. Swarthmore College.
  • Postdoc. Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, University of Wisconsin Madison. Supervisor: Dr. Claudio Gratton
  • Ph.D. Biological Science, Florida State University, Advisor: Dr. Nora Underwood
  • M.Sc. Zoology, University of Florida, Advisor: Dr. Bob Holt
  • B.Sc. Resource Conservation, McGill University (Montreal, Canada)

Hobbies: Gardening, hiking, running, cycling, and hanging out with family


POST DOCS

Rachel Harman (Postdoctoral Scholar)

Rachel_Harman

Rachel’s research interests lie in understanding movement patterns of insects within fragmented landscapes.  Rachel is working with Tania to characterize beneficial and pest insect movement patterns within landscapes that vary with land use and climate change.


CURRENT STUDENTS

Jessica Butters (M.Sc. student)

Jessica recent

Jessica graduated from Central College in Iowa. For her Master’s project, she examines the impact of different land management practices such as border crops, fire rotation, and grazing on pollinator communities.  In her spare time, Jessica likes to hike, back, play guitar, sketch, swing dance, and even has a black belt in Tae Kwon Do! For past research, Jessica studied the benefits of planting tall grass prairie for soil health in poor quality, marginal, agricultural land. In the future, Jessica wants to continue research at the intersection of agriculture and ecology; to quantify the efficacy of ecosystem services, and discover new agricultural solutions that will be sustainable for crops and wildlife.

Hannah Stowe (M.Sc. student co-advised with J.P. Michaud)

169hannahstowe

Hannah is a recent graduate of the University of St. Louis, MO. and will examine how spatial and temporal variability in food resources within agricultural landscapes affects the fitness and physiology of lady beetles and biocontrol potential. Hannah likes working with her hands and spending time outdoors and hopes to use her interest in insects to further conservation and awareness of insect interactions with ecological recovery.  In her spare time she enjoys reading, drawing and exploring new places and experiences through travel.

Marco Ponce (PhD student co-advised with Rob Morrison at USDA)

Marco

Originally from Tijuana, Mexico, Marco graduated with a B.A. in biology from Kalamazoo College in 2019. During his undergraduate studies, he mentored and introduced many elementary-aged children to the physiology and development of insects while providing opportunities to interact with live insects. He is dedicated to mentoring the next generation of STEM students, and he continues to advocate for equality and justice in under-served communities. Currently, he is a NSF Graduate Research Fellow and his research interests include post-harvest insect-microbe interactions and their implications for global food quality, human health, and insect behavior. Marco’s long-term goals include increasing the sustainability of global food production, enhancing food security, and improving human health.

Caroline Gatschet (Undergraduate student)

Gatschet.Caroline

Caroline is currently a junior majoring in Animal Sciences and Industry within the Pre-Veterinary Medicine option. While she is still exploring her options, she hopes to pursue a career in either large animal veterinary medicine or research within the field of biology. Here in the lab, Caroline is assisting the pollinator project by pinning and organizing collected insect specimens. Outside of school, she enjoys drawing, reading, playing tennis, being outdoors, and traveling to explore new places.


PAST STUDENTS

Savannah Piper (Undergraduate student)

Savannah Piper

Savannah graduate in Fall 2019 in Animal Science with a minor in Entomology. Savannah was Tania’s research assistant and helped set up the new lab and greenhouse spaces, run bean beetle experiments, and helped with pollinator field work.  In her spare time, she volunteered for the Purple Paws Cat Program, spent time with family and friends, played the piano, and paints. She is currently at Oregon pursuing research and grad school opportunities.

Weston Ahles (Undergraduate student)

Weston's poster

Weston is an Animal Science Major and examined the benefits of lady beetle movement on feeding rates and the potential consequences for biocontrol.  Weston was involved in the Undergraduate Research Experience program in 2019 and found that lady beetles given opportunity to move after diapause have a greater likelihood of feeding and feed faster!

Paige Connor (Undergraduate student)

Paige's poster

Paige is a senior in biology at K-State.  She examined the impact of bison grazing and fire rotation on the abundances of different guilds of insect pollinators.  She found that bison grazing increased the abundances of pollinators (some groups more than others) but fire rotation had no effect.

Madison Lofing (Undergraduate student)

Madison profile

Madison is a senior at Kansas State University interested in Wildlife Conservation.  Madison worked on an independent research project during Fall 2018 examining how flower morphology affects honey bee visitation rates.


COLLABORATORS

Brian Spiesman (Research Assistant Professor, Kansas State University)

Brian_Spiesman

Brian studies the landscape ecology of pollinators and plant-pollinator networks. We are working on 2 USDA funded projects: (1) the role of temporal heterogeneity  in food availability on consumer-resource interaction, and (2) the impact of perennial border crops on pollinator diversity.  We are also working to build a much needed pollinator conservation program in Kansas.

Claudio Gratton (Professor, University of Wisconsin Madison)

Claudio

Claudio’s research centers around the landscape ecology of arthropods in both agricultural and natural systems.  We are working on a USDA funded project examining how temporal heterogeneity in food availability affect consumer (lady beetle) populations in Wisconsin.

Ebony Murrell  (The Land Institute, Salina KS)

Ebony-Murrell

Ebony is the lead scientist in crop protection at the Land Institute (a nonprofit research in Salina, KS). Her research centers around finding sustainable ways to manage pests and pollinators in agriculture through practices such as crop diversification and cover cropping. We are working on a project examining how different perennial crop borders might affect pollinator diversity.


Interested in joining the lab?  Check out the opportunities page for more information on how to join!